ChatGPT Firm May Let Users Create Their Own Porn

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(Jacob Bruns, Headline USA) OpenAI, the company behind ChatGPT, is investigating the possibility of allowing users to create their own, personalized pornographic videos, the Guardian reported Thursday.

Along with ChatGPT, OpenAI also operate the image creator, DALL-E. The company is reportedly considering allowing users of their platforms to create content that is “not-safe-for-work.”

“We believe developers and users should have the flexibility to use our services as they see fit,” they wrote in a recently released document.

Developers are also “exploring” the possibility of providing “NSFW content in age-appropriate contexts” with a greater understanding of “societal expectations.”

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Some OpenAI employees, however, claimed that the company, while open to the idea of its technology being used for erotica literature, still opposes its use for the creation of deep fake pornography.

Joanne Jang, an employee in San Franscisco who helped write the document, said that she wants to be sure that the company does not violate anybody’s “rights” by allowing them to participate in online erotica text- or image-making.

“We want to ensure that people have maximum control to the extent that it doesn’t violate the law or other people’s rights, but enabling deepfakes is out of the question, period,” Jang said, still trying to distance the company from the pornography industry.

“This doesn’t mean that we are trying now to create AI porn.”

For the sake of a few “creative cases,” she argued, it may be necessary to allow content involving sexuality or nudity, which is “important” to some AI users.

Beeban Kidron, an activist for child online safety, claimed that OpenAI has “rapidly undermined its own mission statement,” a statement that suggests the company is interested in producing “safe and beneficial” content.

According to Kidron, OpenAI’s statements are “endlessly disappointing,” concerned with “AI erotica” rather than taking “practical steps” to avoid creating additional “harms,” she said.

Clare McGlynn, a law professor at Durham University and an expert in pornography regulation, said that most companies that try to “responsibly” create pornography or other adult content typically go off the rails.

“I am deeply skeptical about any way in which they will try to limit this to consensually made, legitimate material,” she said.

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