Biden Once Again Dependent on Scripted Note Cards During Joint Press Conference

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(Headline USA) President Joe Biden once again appeared heavily dependent on notecards during his press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida on Wednesday.

Throughout the presser, the 81-year-old frequently looked down at his cheat sheets, which typically include reporters’ names, which publication they work for, and sometimes even the specific questions the White House has agreed to let them ask.

Biden also remarked that he had a “list” of reporters to call on.

“Who do I call on next? Hang on a second. I got my list here. Hang on. I apologize,” Biden said.

Earlier that day, Biden was also seen referring to his notecards while welcoming Kishida in the Oval Office.

“Well, Fumio, welcome back to the White House. Welcome back to the Oval Office. It’s good to have you here. Good to see you again. When we were here last year, we said the role being played by the United States and Japan is becoming even greater. And we… I couldn’t agree more with your assertion back then. And what we see in our joint support for Ukraine on the face of Russia’s vicious assault is just outrageous,” Biden said.

The White House has defended the president’s dependence on cheatsheets for public functions, dismissing concerns about Biden’s ability to meet with reporters and public officials without them.

Asked in March about the issue, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre snapped, “You’re upset because the president has note cards? You’re asking me a question about the president having note cards?”

Reporters, however, are not the only ones who have noticed Biden’s dependence on his notes. Even Democratic donors have expressed concern over Biden’s inability to take questions without them during private events.

“The staged Q&A sessions have left some donors wondering whether Biden can withstand the rigors of a presidential campaign, let alone potential debates with former President Trump, 77,” Axios reported earlier this year.

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